Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Sarasvati sarovar, Ad badri seen from space



The sarasvati sarovar 80m X 80m close to Kapal Mochan soma sarovar (20km. from Jagadhri, Yamunanagar dist.) not far from Paonta Saheb in HP, is a tribute to swargiya Moropant Pingle ji. The sarovar has come up at the same spot where he did yajna in search of Vedic River Sarasvati and started on a scientific discovery process with a team led by the late Padmashri Vakankar ji.

What a privilege it is to be living in times when River Sarasvati is coming to bless us and future generations. One Jaina muni told me that we will have no punarjanmam because of this tirthasthanam. We owe it to Pawankumar, Dy. Forest Officer, Haryana who constructed the sarovar in 7 days the moment he got the nod from the DC, Yamunanagar who mentioned the approval from Hon'ble Jagmohan ji.

There is a saying in Tamil. muzhu poosanikkaaye sottile maraikka mudiyaadu (one can't hide a whole pumpkin in a morsel of cooked rice). Sarasvati heritage, viraasat is effulgent like the sun and will live as long as mahaakaala is engaged in taandava nrityam demonstrating the cosmic order of dharma.

We need to get a Sarasvati River Basin Development Authority organized by Govt. of India and reach reborn Sarasvati into Gujarat by the svarnajayanti year. She has travelled about 1000 kms. from Manasarovar glacier (Mt. Kailas) upt Gedra Road, Barmer Dist. in a 40 ft. wide 12 ft. deep channel. We need to take our children to Ahmedabad for a sacred in the dip in reborn Sarasvati there.

Last year Karthik Purnima day, lakhs visited both Kapala mochan and Ad Badri Sarasvati sarovar. This deepam has to be handed over to the youngest nation on the face of the globe. This is our kapala mochan.

dhanyavaadah.

kalyanaraman

http://sites.google.com/site/kalyan97/Nadi/adbadri.jpg?attredirects=0

Kapal Mochan mela ends in Haryana

Saturday, November 24 2007 21:24 (IST)

Yamunanagar, Nov 24 (UNI) The famous historical and religious Kapal Mochan Mela concluded as about 10 lakh devotees took the holy dip at the stroke of midnight in the three historic sarovars here.

They lit 'diyaas' on the banks of the sarovars, which coupled with the electric lights, decorated the gurudwaras and templespresenting a picturesque scene.

The Kapal Mochan fair has its roots in the age-old myth that it relieves the sins of all the three eras. As per the belief of the people, taking a bath in Kapal Mochan sarovars washes away sins which are even as grave as 'Brahma Hatya'.

The Kapal Mochan 'dham' here is also believed to have been the workplace of Maharishi Ved Vyas, the son of Maharishi Prashar and the creator of great epic Mahabharata.

There are five 'tiraths' in different directions of the Kapal Mochan. In the north is Tirthraj Kapal Mochan itself and on other sides are Som Sarovar, Rin Mochan, Surya Kund and Chandar Kund.

These sarovars are known to provide fame and fortune to those who come to take the holy bath.

The holy place has a great following among the Sikh community too, since in 1687 Guru Gobind Singh had rested here for 52 days after the Bangani battle.

UNI HS DB SR RN2121 http://news.oneindia.in/2007/11/24/kapal-mochan-mela-ends-in-haryana-1195921990.html





http://sites.google.com/site/kalyan97/_/rsrc/1222579840973/Nadi/adbadri.jpg

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Seal find from Afghanistan showing a spearing motif


Olaf Sprenger has reported (September 2008) a new seal find from Afghanistan showing the unique yet recurring motif of a person kicking and spearing a bison (bull):
http://www.seal-collector.de/pageID_4545804_4.html

See large image at http://www.seal-collector.de/mediapool/54/540878/images/seal-collector/Bullfight1.JPG

The mleccha reading of the motif is as follows:
Mlecchita vikalpa (cryptography): kolsa = to kick the foot forward (Santali) kola = killing (Te.)
Mleccha (words from Sarasvati civilization linguistic area) Rebus: kol = metal; pancaloha (Ta.) kol, kolhe, ‘the koles, an aboriginal tribe if iron smelters speaking a language akin to that of Santals’ (Santali) kol = kollan-, kamma_l.an- (blacksmith or smith in general)(Ta.lex.) kollar = those who guard the treasure (Ta.lex.) cf. golla (Telugu) khol, kholi_ = a metal covering; a loose covering of metal or cloth (G.)
I do not know how to interpret the pair of rectangles. The slightly atrophied sign 'claws of crab' can be read.
claws of crab: kakr.a_; cf. karkat.i_ 'female crab' (Skt.) rebus: kangar 'furnace' (Kashmiri).

The seal can thus be identified as denoting the furnace (kangar) of a smelter (kolhe).

Kalyanaraman
12 Sept. 2008

Spearing a buffalo/bull/bison: a Sarasvati hieroglyptic composition http://www.scribd.com/doc/5989643/Spearing-a-Buffalo

Read this document on Scribd: Spearing a Buffalo

Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Ancient metallurgy and mleccha writing on pure tin ingots

Ancient metallurgy and mleccha writing on pure tin ingots

The finds of two pure tin ingots in a shipwreck in Haifa inscribed with Sarasvati hieroglyphs (so-called Indus script)should be of interest to scholars and researchers of Hindu-judaic studies and language studies, to unravel further the nature of the maritime civilization contacts between ca. 4th to 2nd millennium BCE.

The hieroglyphs have been read as connoting ranku dhaatu 'tin mineral'.

It is intriguing indeed that the words, ranku dhaatu, represented as hieroglyphs are tagged to the lingua franca, mleccha (cognate meluhha).

It is interesting to note the Hebrew phrase: melech ha-melachim.

Who were the meluhha, mleccha, melachim who seem to have dominated the dawn of the early metal-alloy-age? See notes on melech at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moloch Aha, early metallurgists, karmaara, kamar made these using cire perdue technique which is used even today by vis'vakarma smiths in Swamimalai on Kaveri river basin.

Dr. S. Kalyanaraman


'Metallurgy of tin ingots and a writing system of ca. 3rd millennium BCE"

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Sarasvati and Rama Setu -- WAVES 2008 presentations

1. Title: Rama Setu, Vedic Traditions and struggle to protect the world heritage

Rama Setu is an abiding cultural tradition of not only Bharatam but of many countries of the world. Rama Setu embodies the quintessence of Valmiki's statement: 'Ramo vigrahavaan dharmah.' Setubandhanam becomes a tirthasthanam in the Vedic tradition of remembering the pitr-s and offering pitr-tarpanam on Ashadha amavasya day every year. The ongoing struggle to protect this world heritage has been long, protracted and tough. Active support of world citizens will make a difference and this struggle to protect an abiding, sanatana tradition will succeed.

Rama Setu tradition is a continuum of Vedic traditions defining dharma in action. Two messages are conveyed in such a definition: 1. determination and samarthyam can find solutions even to bridge the ocean; 2. to establish dharma and to fight against a-dharma, the effort is imperative. Skandapurana is emphatic that three s'ivalingas were installed by Sri Rama, one at Rameshwaram (Dhanushkodi end), one at Tirukkedeeshwaram (Talaimannar end) and the third in the middle of the Setu. Setubandhanam becomes a tirthasthanam in the Vedic tradition of remembering the pitr-s and offering pitr-tarpanam on Ashadha amavasya day every year.

2. Title: Ongoing attack on Hindu symbols: Sarasvati, Vedic language and cultural traditions

The discovery of over 2000 archaeological sites on the banks of Vedic River Sarasvati and the possibility of identifying Vedic people from new discoveries such as those in Bhirrana provide a challenge to all researchers to unravel the language spoken by the creators of the Sarasvati civilization. There is an ongoing attack from some in Western academia, on Hindu symbols including svastika and the denial of the Vedic River Sarasvati whose ancient channels have been emphatically, scientifically identified. This state of academic denial is pathetic and is governed by a compulsive motive to establish Aryan supremacy through invasion or migration scenarios. Such Aryan Invasion/Migration Theories are in fact the myths. Sarasvati is not a myth but a reality and will flow again in North-west India thanks to the brilliant effort of scholars, researchers, scientists and engineers of Hindusthana.

Title 3: Sarasvati, Vedic language and cultural traditions

The discovery of over 2000 archaeological sites on the banks of Vedic River Sarasvati and the possibility of identifying Vedic people from new discoveries such as those in Bhirrana provide a challenge to all researchers to unravel the language spoken by the creators of the Sarasvati civilization. I have posited that mleccha was the lingua franca and mlecchita vikalpa was the writing system of the civilization evidenced by nearly 4000 epigraphs containing 'signs' and 'pictorial motifs' -- most of which are hieroglyphs. The resource of an Indian Lexicon providing comparative lexemes from over 25 ancient languages of Bharatam including Vedic provide a framework for testing the mleccha spoken by Yudhisthira in his conversations with Khanaka and Vidura and the mlecchita vikalpa mentioned by Vatsyayana as one of the three arts: 1. des'a bhaashaa jnaanam; 2. akshara mushthika kathanam; and 3. mlecchita vikalpat (correctly interpreted as cryptography). Given the fact that many mleccha word occur in the Vedic texts (words which cannot be explained by Indo-European constructs), it is possible to provide a framework for language studies of ancient Bharatam and of Vedic times, which integrate language as a medium of cultural expression by a community of speakers, rejecting the language family metaphor. Many ancient texts clearly refer to mleccha as a 'language' or 'dialect'. The framework for a Sarasvati Hieroglyph Dictionary was presented.


http://www.scribd.com/full/3757859?access_key=key-xhw40e1a9nd7l66ahgy

Read this document on Scribd: Sarasvati and mleccha


Metaphors of Sarasvati civilization in a cultural continuum

Read this document on Scribd: sarasvati -- Cultural continuum


Rama Setu – heritage

Read this document on Scribd: Rama setu - heritage

Saturday, June 21, 2008

Mother divinity: River Sarasvati, Hindu civilization traditions and metaphors created by rishi-s and artisans

http://www.scribd.com/doc/3509029/sarasvatimetaphor

Read this document on Scribd: sarasvatimetaphor

Mother divinity: River Sarasvati, Hindu civilization traditions and metaphors created by rishi-s and artisans

Hindu civilization has a unique metaphor: river as mother, river as divinity; vedic River Sarasvati as mother, as divinity. In many parts of India, the lingua franca phrase used for a river is: nayi maa, (mother river); in Ca_ran.a sahitya (the songs of bards) of Rajasthan and northern India, the word used for a river is amba_ ‘mother’, evoking the Rigvedic phrase ‘ambitame’ (best of rivers). Rigveda also refers to River Sarasvati in the following exquisite terms: sarasvati_ saptathi_ sindhuma_ta_ (Sarasvati, the seventh, the mother river). The artisans of the civilization which was nurtured on the banks of the river depicted their life-activity of smithy through many metaphors derived from mleccha (meluhha) lingua franca in a linguistic area. A river is also depicted as a kumbha ‘sacred pot’ as in kumbhamela held every 12 years in a confluence of Ganga, Yamuna and Sarasvati rivers at Prayag.
A metaphor for Sarasvati river is kumbha...

Read on...

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Friday, June 6, 2008

Making Vedic Sarasvati flow again...

http://www.scribd.com/doc/3258521/Making-Sarasvati-flow-again


Read this doc on Scribd: Making Sarasvati flow again...